Press Conference And Rally For Our Forest – April 13th - Fund Raising News & Events - Nova Scotia Hunting

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Press Conference And Rally For Our Forest – April 13th


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#1 dave

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 03:45 PM

The following announcement was emailed to me today by Raymond Plourde of the Ecology Action Centre. Once you read this message, If you are planning or considering taking part in the rally, please post a reply in this thread. Thanks.

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Important Notice: Press Conference and Rally for Our Forest – April 13th
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Friends:
Please join us for a massive gathering to let government know we want better for our forests, now!
Where: Four Points Sheraton, 1496 Hollis St. Halifax (click for map), to be followed by a march to the Legislature
When: Wednesday, April 13th, 10:00am for a press conference, and 11:30 for a march to the Legislature to deliver our message to government

Why: to raise a little heck about the state of our forests!

Who: Every group and individual who cares about healthy forests and healthy communities

We are going to show the government that Nova Scotians are serious about better environmental stewardship of forests. We want real change, and we want government to act now to live up to Nova Scotians’ expectations for change.

The now long-overdue Natural Resources Strategy was due (by law) last December and is still nowhere to be seen. At the same time government policy to encourage large-scale forest biomass projects to generate electricity continues despite the clear recommendations of the Natural Resources Strategy Phase 2 report against it. (see www.gov.ns.ca/natr/strategy2010/)

The government is not listening to either the report or the public on this issue and big industry players like NewPage, Northern Pulp, Nova Scotia Power and even Lockheed Martin are gearing up to cut and burn huge amounts of our forest – on top of all the cutting that is already going on. No doubt other players also planning forest biomass projects.

Once again, Nova Scotians must speak for our forests and our wildlife – who cannot speak for themselves. Please come and join us on Wednesday, April 13th in Halifax and let the politicians know that more industrial forest cutting is unacceptable and that they must put the brakes on forest biomass before it gets out of hand.

For more information contact:

Jamie Simpson, EAC Forestry Program Coordinator
902-429-1335, [email protected]

Raymond Plourde, EAC Wilderness Coordinator
902-442-5008, [email protected]


For more information on the biomass situation go to:
http://www.ecologyac...cations#biomass

The following was published in The Chronicle Herald on March 19, 2011:

No such thing as 'waste wood'

The next great wave of forest consumption is just getting underway in Nova Scotia. Thought we were going to see less clearcutting? Think again. It’s called "biomass" and in a perversion of the term "green," our new NDP government has decided that burning our forests for electricity is a good idea and will officially count towards Nova Scotia Power’s "renewable energy" targets.

Big industry players are lining up to take advantage of this new market and our forests and wildlife are trembling with anticipation.

The public has been told repeatedly that large pulp mills and Nova Scotia Power will simply be burning "waste wood" to produce this wonderful new "green energy." Sounds logical, right? How could burning wood that is just going to waste be anything but good? The problem is: There is no "waste" wood that is not already being used. In the last 20 years, the traditional forestry industries have adapted to tight times by investing in every possible efficiency — including finding marketable uses for the formerly discarded bark, chips and sawdust produced in the conventional milling processes. Pulp and sawmill operations have also become tightly integrated, buying, selling and using every scrap of wood refuse they produce. So there is, in fact, no wood being wasted at all.

The reality is that the government-approved plan to burn "waste wood" really means more forest cutting, a lot more — up to a million new tonnes a year. Of course, it might not be so bad if we were reducing cutting in some other sector to make room for it — but we’re not. Logging for biomass will be on top of the large volumes already being cut by our existing forestry industry.

This will mean about 20 per cent more cutting per year for decades to come. Most will be in the form of additional clearcutting since the price for biomass will be so low (est. $33 per ton) that it will be the only economically feasible way to do it.

And the best part is we all get to pay for it. Nova Scotians will be subsidizing forest biomass burning through higher electricity bills. The $208 million for NewPage’s massive boiler project will be passed directly on to NSP customers. And the proposed rate to be paid for producers of biomass energy under the feed-in tariff program is 12 per cent higher than wind energy — again, an additional expense added directly to customers’ electricity bills.

Allowing the rise of this new biomass juggernaut flies in the face of common sense and the government’s own Natural Resources Strategy. This tortuously long, three-year, three-phase process involved exhaustive public consultations (Phase 1) and an expert panel review (Phase 2). Their conclusions were clear: "Across Nova Scotia, a resounding call for change has been voiced. Current natural resource practices … are not sustainable. The status quo is not an option. Unless there is change, Nova Scotia’s natural resources will continue to be destroyed."

Their No. 1 recommendation was equally direct: "The panel strongly urges caution in any decision by government to approve use of biomass for power generation. The Steering Panel advises that the province view the current agreement between NewPage Port Hawkesbury Ltd. and Nova Scotia Power Inc. as a pilot project and carefully monitor its impact on forests over time, basing future decisions on those findings. There is ample evidence that our forests are already under considerable stress … Nova Scotia does not have the wood capacity for biomass use to make much of a difference. … It is counter-intuitive for the province to protect the environment by cutting down too many trees."

The final result of the Natural Resources Strategy process is Phase 3 — the government plan. It was due (by law) to be tabled by the end of last year. It wasn’t. Instead, the report has gone underground and the lead minister, John MacDonell, has been replaced. Voluntary Planning, the well-respected, arm’s-length agency that conducted the Phase 1 public consultation and many other landmark public processes, has also been quietly shut down. Now, like the wetland policy and several other environmental goals, the government deadline has come and gone and the Natural Resources Strategy is nowhere to be seen.

This is disappointing to the thousands of Nova Scotians who participated in good faith in a long and exhaustive public process. The public spoke loud and clear and the expert panels looked long and hard. They said, in essence, "there is too much cutting; reduce it." The government’s response, not through the missing Natural Resources Strategy but through its contradictory Renewable Electricity Plan, has instead set the stage for the biggest increase in forest cutting in decades. And all this from an NDP government that used to be the environment’s best friend but now seems to have lost its way.

Of course, they can still step back from the abyss and restore their green cred on this issue if they want to. They have the power and clear policy direction from a credible, transparent and highly public process. The Renewable Electricity Plan also recognizes and specifically defers to the yet-to-be-released Natural Resource Strategy on the question of forest biomass. The question is: Will the NDP government respect the process and put the brakes on biomass before it’s too far gone or will they ignore it and allow this new consumptive wave to roll over the forests of Nova Scotia?

A big part of their environmental credibility, not to mention the fate of our forests, hangs in the balance.

********************************************************************************************************************************

Raymond Plourde is wilderness co-ordinator and Jamie Simpson is forestry program co-ordinator at Ecology Action Centre.
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#2 Hfx.Hunter

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 06:25 PM

Hopefully the NDP will finally do something constructive and cut funding to the Ecology Action Center - a group which opposes almost all urban / rural economic development and whose answer to our energy problems would seem to be put a sweater on and shiver in the cold.
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#3 bubba682

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 07:05 PM

Hopefully the NDP will finally do something constructive and cut funding to the Ecology Action Center - a group which opposes almost all urban / rural economic development and whose answer to our enery problems would seem to be put a sweater on and shiver in the cold.

Right on man that was funny,from what i've been readin theres alot more to biomass burning than clearcutting.I read an article were alot of wood burned will be scrap wood that usually goes into landfills,lots being cleared etc.Also the powerplant is goin to be a co gen plant which means it'll burn wood,oil,coal or natural gas so i ain't to worried about it.
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#4 dave

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 08:48 AM

Related article in today's Herald:

http://thechronicleh...t/1237939.html' class='bbc_url' title='External link' rel='nofollow external'>N.S. chops biomass quota by 30 per cent
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#5 Mecheng

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Posted 13 April 2011 - 07:36 AM

Also the powerplant is goin to be a co gen plant which means it'll burn wood,oil,coal or natural gas so i ain't to worried about it.

Thats not what a co-gen plant means by the way. A co-gen plant means they will burn product to make steam to generate power and then use the excess (waste) heat in the steam for heating.
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#6 rogerb

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Posted 16 April 2011 - 10:41 PM

I would hope that this sites admin. would distance itself a bit from the ecology action centre. They are not our friends. They are just using this site for there own gain, then will knife you in the back to kick us out of the woods.
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#7 Trapper Gary

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 02:36 AM

I think more hunters and trappers shold submit there names to be on the board of directors of such groups.
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When non members do web searches on subjects, some times your opion posted on this site gets noticed, and can give another perspective !

#8 Halftail

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 07:17 AM

I would hope that this sites admin. would distance itself a bit from the ecology action centre. They are not our friends. They are just using this site for there own gain, then will knife you in the back to kick us out of the woods.

Very true!
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If you can't convince them,confuse them.

#9 dave

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 10:43 AM

All advice is appreciated. I personally have no reason to believe the EAC has any ill intentions when it comes to anglers and hunters however I will take your advice and make a mental note of it. Thanks.
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#10 bubba682

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 10:38 PM

Thats not what a co-gen plant means by the way. A co-gen plant means they will burn product to make steam to generate power and then use the excess (waste) heat in the steam for heating.

Well now ive worked on 2 of them so far they were using natural gas to run it now i'm no engeneer but are you sure your not talkin about super heaters that are in conventional power plants like ns power has now because they heat the steam.Any way i'll be goin to the union hall this week i'll be takin to a coupl;e of fitters to see exactly what type of power plant its going to be as to what it can be fueled by....
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#11 Mecheng

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 07:41 PM

Most modern co-gen plants are natural gas fired turbines, and then the waste heat in the gas turbine exhausts do one of two things ; 1)make steam to power a steam turbine or 2)make steam or hot water for a district heating system. But any power plant can be a co-gen plant if the heat rejected in the condenser is used for heating (district heating, university heating, municipal heating, etc), and as you know every steam plant has a condenser.
Oil and gas is my thing but power plant design and power generation is a close second.
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#12 rogerb

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Posted 19 April 2011 - 10:43 AM

All advice is appreciated. I personally have no reason to believe the EAC has any ill intentions when it comes to anglers and hunters however I will take your advice and make a mental note of it. Thanks.


I volunteered on the Tobeatic advisory group for a local group a few years back. EAC also had rep there. I can tell you when they say they want a protected area, they want it protected from everything(except them). They wanted no hunting, no trapping, no fishing, no trails. They wanted a buffer area around it so sounds from roads, construction could not be heard in the wilderness area. They wanted the "tin mine" road shut down because animals might wander out of the WA and be struck by cars. Then they wanted thousands more acres added to it. Some of the additional areas have the highest concentrations of camps in NS. No my friend they are not on our side.
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#13 bubba682

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 07:31 PM

Most modern co-gen plants are natural gas fired turbines, and then the waste heat in the gas turbine exhausts do one of two things ; 1)make steam to power a steam turbine or 2)make steam or hot water for a district heating system. But any power plant can be a co-gen plant if the heat rejected in the condenser is used for heating (district heating, university heating, municipal heating, etc), and as you know every steam plant has a condenser.
Oil and gas is my thing but power plant design and power generation is a close second.

I found out today its just a regular plant and not a gas fired turbine but its only a small plant i'm not a mech engineer i'm just a welder/fitter.In other words i'm the guy who got make sence out of those designs an prints lol....One day maybe you guys will figure out that you can't stick a pipe 1'' from an i beem an expect a guy to weld it lol
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