How Big Can Trees Be In Nova Scotia? - Scenery/Trailcam - Nova Scotia Hunting

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How Big Can Trees Be In Nova Scotia?


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#1 labradort

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Posted 13 October 2020 - 07:44 AM

Large tree fallen

 

I encountered this fallen tree yesterday in the woods.  It's hard to judge the size from that photo, but the thickness was about 3 feet.  I've read that most of Nova Scotia has been wood harvested over the centuries since white people arrived.  This log has me wondering if trees can actually be common in this size if a region was left natural for hundreds of years.  I had noticed similarities with Labrador in some ways in these areas: large boulders in the woods, lichen, labrador tea plants.  I figured the topsoil was poor and trees didn't get very big.  So sighting this log was a shock to me.

 


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#2 Joyrider

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Posted 13 October 2020 - 08:43 AM

I had similar thoughts when I was turkey hunting in Maine a few years back.  Everywhere we went there were stands of huge trees (huge by NS standards - like the one you posted) and I wondered what the woods in NS must have been likle "back in the day".  I used to hunt an area around Bridgewater with big trees (not that big) and it was so open under them you could easily see around 150 yeards and could have driven a truck around in there without any trouble.

That's what the woods here must have been like, not the small tight trees I am pushing through with all of my might during rabbit season. biggrin.png


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#3 superslickie

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Posted 13 October 2020 - 02:40 PM

I know a spot that has several large trees , I'd bet almost 4ft for a few. I used to take the scouts there and have them guess how old the tree was. There is a formula for figuring that out.
We guess anywhere from 150 to 200yrs and then we tried to think of what was happening during the time frame
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can i go hunting yet??

#4 3macs1

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Posted 13 October 2020 - 03:16 PM

I have sawn some 3 foot hemlock at the base a few  times

Cheers


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#5 rasorbackq

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Posted 13 October 2020 - 03:17 PM

On the back line of my property 148 acres back there are a few 5' across Hemlock and some 4 ' pine.  Very impressive trees. . Beyond my property is Crown lands backing onto a large lake.

 The only reason they still are standing not cost effective to get them out.. These trees are beyond the 1000 acre alder swamp that I bear  hunt the civilization side of it.


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#6 labradort

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Posted 13 October 2020 - 07:07 PM

I didn't know hemlock get that big.  There are plenty at Keji and I never noticed really large ones.  Part of the park was formerly farmland if I understood it, so those would not be old growth.  The tree in the photo is I believe white northern cedar judging by the bark.


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#7 gary

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Posted 14 October 2020 - 06:21 AM

tree doesnt have to be huge to be old - some of those windswept, windstunted trees along our coasts can be quite old. Recall a unniversity doing tree coring & finding some 400+ year old trees that were not that big in diameter.

 

used to hunt/fish/canoe in Annapolis County, back in the day, and been in a cpl areas like Joyrider describes - pretty awesome.

 

Abraham Lake wilderness area has some impressive old growth red spruce stands - hear theyve got a beetle attacking them recently.

 

Always cool finding giants in our forests.


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#8 greybeard

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Posted 14 October 2020 - 06:54 AM

When I was a teenager, I remember stopping to look at a Pine tree at the end of a gravel road in Pictou County, It had a plaque on it that said it was 200 years old?, it was more than three feet in diameter.

We have a few two and half foot diameter Pines and Hemlocks at the back of our property close to what is known locally as the Philadelphia line 1800 time frame more or less.


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Insanity/Hunting...doing the same thing over and over again hoping for a different outcome.

#9 Tripple D

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Posted 14 October 2020 - 06:40 PM

One area I hunt has a large stand of hemlock as described above where you can see a long ways. Been that way ever since I started hunting there about 50 yrs ago! Another spot in the area has a big old pine tree at least 5’ diameter,which they left standing when they clear cut that area 35-40 yrs ago, it’s still standing as well, my father and I shot a lot of deer over the years sitting under that tree!
So which have the largest diameter- evergreens or deciduous. We took down a large maple in the front yard. The biggest pieces were larger in diameter then I am tall and I’m 6’101/2” tall.
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#10 3macs1

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Posted 15 October 2020 - 06:51 AM

One area I hunt has a large stand of hemlock as described above where you can see a long ways. Been that way ever since I started hunting there about 50 yrs ago! Another spot in the area has a big old pine tree at least 5’ diameter,which they left standing when they clear cut that area 35-40 yrs ago, it’s still standing as well, my father and I shot a lot of deer over the years sitting under that tree!
So which have the largest diameter- evergreens or deciduous. We took down a large maple in the front yard. The biggest pieces were larger in diameter then I am tall and I’m 6’101/2” tall.

Is that a typo???


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#11 louisbear

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Posted 15 October 2020 - 11:33 AM

One area I hunt has a large stand of hemlock as described above where you can see a long ways. Been that way ever since I started hunting there about 50 yrs ago! Another spot in the area has a big old pine tree at least 5’ diameter,which they left standing when they clear cut that area 35-40 yrs ago, it’s still standing as well, my father and I shot a lot of deer over the years sitting under that tree!
So which have the largest diameter- evergreens or deciduous. We to
ok down a large maple in the front yard. The biggest pieces were larger in diameter then I am tall and I’m 6’101/2” tall.


Tripple D Are you telling us a Tall Tale?
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#12 Tripple D

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Posted 15 October 2020 - 08:26 PM

Tripple D Are you telling us a Tall Tale?

Is that a typo???


Lol sorry guys that should be 5’ 101/2”
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Everyone out there in NSH land have a super duper day and please store your guns in a safe manner 🇨🇦🏌️‍♀️🎱🦌🤠

#13 3macs1

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Posted 16 October 2020 - 06:14 AM

Lol sorry guys that should be 5’ 101/2”

LOL I figured as much since why would you need a tree stand to hunt deer way up there

 Take care


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#14 Rembolt

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Posted 16 October 2020 - 06:14 AM

I walked through an old growth stand of hemlock yesterday in the St Marys river valley . I would say the butt diameter of any one of trees is plus 30" and is the 80 to 90 feet tall . it truly does make one feel small to stand in the midst of that great stand of hemlock . back in the early 90ies I worked in the forest industry in Guysbrough county .I can recall cutting white pine in several areas that were plus 60" on the butt and one that that measured more that 6 feet on the butt . more than 2 cord of marketable wood and did not include the 2 main trunk 16 foot logs .
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#15 3macs1

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Posted 16 October 2020 - 06:23 AM

Did not know this existed but I cannot see the 60 entries for dimensions??

 

https://inaturalist....-of-nova-scotia


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#16 louisbear

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Posted 17 October 2020 - 06:27 PM

I walked through an old growth stand of hemlock yesterday in the St Marys river valley . I would say the butt diameter of any one of trees is plus 30" and is the 80 to 90 feet tall . it truly does make one feel small to stand in the midst of that great stand of hemlock . back in the early 90ies I worked in the forest industry in Guysbrough county .I can recall cutting white pine in several areas that were plus 60" on the butt and one that that measured more that 6 feet on the butt . more than 2 cord of marketable wood and did not include the 2 main trunk 16 foot logs .

My mom grew up on a farm on East River St Mary’s and I remember the huge Elm trees surrounding the old house . One had a swing on it until it was cut down about fifteen years ago. One of them is still standing even though the house was replaced. The area had giant pine trees as well. As young teens myself and two cousins went for a hike in the woods on the farm and got lost big time. Finally we came across a big old pine tree and the my cousin climbed up in it until he could just pick out the roof line of the cattle barn not too far off. Thanks to that tree we were able to get out onto the back road and make our way home. Oh the good ole days. 😟
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#17 David G

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Posted 18 October 2020 - 11:04 AM

"Thanks to that tree we were able to get out onto the back road and make our way home. Oh the good ole days. 😟"

 

louisbear, When the compass fails you or you fail to bring it, climbing the tallest tree always offers the next best solution to knowing where you are in the woods...that use to be a common practice.

 

With everyone's cell phone loaded with GPS and Google Earth, I doubt that any of the younger hunters will ever have to revert back to that...


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