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Question On The Regs


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#21 Tripple D

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Posted 20 November 2020 - 07:03 PM

Buddy of mine use to do surveying. He says in a couple places his compass would not work just kept spinning. He claims it’s due to very high iron ore content in the areas.
I usually carry my compass but sometimes it gets left in a different pair of pants or the truck. Quite often I forget to take a bearing before going in too,lol. I’ve been turned around many times but always managed to find my way out. But some places I hunt I don’t need a compass anyway because I know my way around. But if someone is hunting their own 200 +/- woodlot why do they need a compass.
If someone hunts only fields why would they need one. My pockets are usually full as I don’t carry a nap sack and I don’t want any rattling noises in my pockets.
Sun rises in the east, sets in the west at night look for the North Star its worked for people forever.
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Everyone out there in NSH land have a super duper day and please store your guns in a safe manner 🇨🇦🏌️‍♀️🎱🦌🤠

#22 gary

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Posted 20 November 2020 - 07:16 PM

ha, ha - just typing about the same thing - was on a fly in hunt in Labrador. The area had lots of iron in the rock - some of the boulders were rubble because the iron rusted out of the rock - wierd.

 

NwxwEL1.jpg

 

 

 

LZSy2Fi.jpg


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#23 Tyson10gauge

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Posted 20 November 2020 - 08:00 PM

So I'm going back about 30+ yrs to my younger days and being part of Cape Breton Search and Rescue , we put on the map and compass courses , different times it was brought up in meetings to make it a secondary mandatory course to the Hunters safety course, but since we taught the courses back then it was included in Hunter Education and just left at that .

We did our own orienteering and map and compass drills along with putting on map and compass courses in the field several times thru the yr to refresh our skills, and help out those actually wanting to improve their skills .
One note I can remember even by older guys in the group was carry two compasses can actually be non advantage as one could actually interfere with the other .

As well as other anomalies such as rock with metal , Magnetic North and True North , compass deteriorating over time , just to name a few . Every two to three yrs I swap out my compasses , there's one in every jacket I own , along with one in every bag or back pack , saying this there a small bag , containing matches , lighter, fat wood and flint and steel . There's always a knife on my belt any time the yr and a back up in just about every piece of gear I own .

Over kill , nope not a chance , chitt can happen in a second in the outdoors . I can even remember talk amount ourselves that fishing season should have that in the regs when traveling in the woods to go fishing in back woods lakes and streams , but as most guys say lots of anglers never leave the road side , so good luck on that implementation .

Should it be mandatory , well it's a debate that will never get resolved or resolution to , now as stated most carry cell phone ( can't live or breathe without them ) and rely on their apps to get them around , but as also stated what would they do in the bush , no knife , no flame source and no orienteering skills or means of directional assistance. Most would be the next on the list for resources to come find them .

Other that those that actually go into the bush kms away from nearest road or trail for nunting , fishing or backpacking I'd say 97% of those going in the woods don't travel more than 50-100 yrds in the woods from nearest road/trail for fear of getting lost . After all there's plenty out there can't judge distances period to even know if they are legal shooting distance .

That's my take , should everyone be required traveling in the woods to have the essentials , you get your A$$, after all I can remember several times finding someone lost during hunting season , don't even have adequate clothing for travel in the bush . It's basic common sense IMHO, but that's in plenty short supply more and more as life progresses
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I'm just a Lone Wolf Red Neck !

#24 1NSH Dave

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Posted 20 November 2020 - 08:13 PM

I would never trust only my cell phone. Doesn’t take much for the battery to drain. Cold, leave an app running, pocket push some buttons and open an app that drains it etc. I had mine go dead one duck hunt because it had pocket pushed its way to google maps and had set a route to get to somewhere and was giving directions. Lol.

Also, even in this modern age there are still LOTS of places in this province with no cell signal. And I don’t mean just way out in the middle of nowhere. You can go 10km out of Truro and get zero service.

With a magnetic compass you don’t even really need actual bearings. The very simplest thing is just knowing which general direction a road is. Once you know that go bushwhacking all you dare.

In my opinion a map is way more important and useful. And that is what google map is best for. I use that to give myself some natural borders. Like I can go through an area and know that if I go too far left I will hit a stream, too far right a clear cut etc etc.
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Time to start hunting them coyotes, I think!!!!

#25 louisbear

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Posted 20 November 2020 - 10:41 PM

I learned the value of a compass and local land marks after a snow storm blew up after dark late one evening in March. We were ice fishing in northern Ontario and just before the “Walleye Bite “ was to start we noticed the dark clouds forming in the sky. The three of us just looked at each other and started pulling lines and packing up the gear. We needed to cross three lakes before getting back to the logging road that would take us back to our trucks. The snow started to blow just as we started up the snow machines and by the time we got to the third lake it was a blizzard. We needed to travel aopprox. 5 kilometres or so across a wide open section of lake from the north to the south. Before making the crossing the three of us got off the machines and made a plan. Usually you could just back track on your machine tracks but the blizzard either covered them with snow or blew the snow completely off the lake leaving a sheet of clear ice. The leader started off at a good pace but the conditions gradually grew worst as we approached the open section of lake. I was second in line and could not see the leader’s tail light because of the storm along with the snow blowing up from his track. I followed his track in the snow in front of me. At times, we crossed shear ice and his track would disappear. He stopped his machine and as I was coming to a halt behind him, I noticed in my review mirror a rotating light behind me. The third man in line braked a little to hard on the wind blown ice and completed three 360 degree circles before coming to a stop.
The lead man was starting to second guess himself as he no longer had any reliable bearings. We all agreed we had to travel due south until we hit the far shore line. We discussed how long it should take to travel the required distance. After confirming with a compass bearing that we were indeed headed due south, I mentioned that I recalled seeing a red light on top of the microwave tower that I could see and used as a guide when returning home on previous trips. We set off agreeing to travel for ten minutes or so and then stop and check our bearings. Eventually we could just see a red flicker of red in the sky and followed it to the south shore and then followed the shore to the landing that led to the logging road. Once back on land and in the protection of the trees the visibility was much better. We were some happy to back on solid ( frozen) ground.
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#26 3macs1

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Posted 21 November 2020 - 06:44 AM

So I'm going back about 30+ yrs to my younger days and being part of Cape Breton Search and Rescue , we put on the map and compass courses , different times it was brought up in meetings to make it a secondary mandatory course to the Hunters safety course, but since we taught the courses back then it was included in Hunter Education and just left at that .

We did our own orienteering and map and compass drills along with putting on map and compass courses in the field several times thru the yr to refresh our skills, and help out those actually wanting to improve their skills .
One note I can remember even by older guys in the group was carry two compasses can actually be non advantage as one could actually interfere with the other .

As well as other anomalies such as rock with metal , Magnetic North and True North , compass deteriorating over time , just to name a few . Every two to three yrs I swap out my compasses , there's one in every jacket I own , along with one in every bag or back pack , saying this there a small bag , containing matches , lighter, fat wood and flint and steel . There's always a knife on my belt any time the yr and a back up in just about every piece of gear I own .

Over kill , nope not a chance , chitt can happen in a second in the outdoors . I can even remember talk amount ourselves that fishing season should have that in the regs when traveling in the woods to go fishing in back woods lakes and streams , but as most guys say lots of anglers never leave the road side , so good luck on that implementation .

Should it be mandatory , well it's a debate that will never get resolved or resolution to , now as stated most carry cell phone ( can't live or breathe without them ) and rely on their apps to get them around , but as also stated what would they do in the bush , no knife , no flame source and no orienteering skills or means of directional assistance. Most would be the next on the list for resources to come find them .

Other that those that actually go into the bush kms away from nearest road or trail for nunting , fishing or backpacking I'd say 97% of those going in the woods don't travel more than 50-100 yrds in the woods from nearest road/trail for fear of getting lost . After all there's plenty out there can't judge distances period to even know if they are legal shooting distance .

That's my take , should everyone be required traveling in the woods to have the essentials , you get your A$$, after all I can remember several times finding someone lost during hunting season , don't even have adequate clothing for travel in the bush . It's basic common sense IMHO, but that's in plenty short supply more and more as life progresses

Well said. I have always been the same and go no where with out a leatherman and if even out for a walk in the woods a buck knife . Any hunting or fishing I did always carried what I called my survival fanny pack as a min with everything matches, lighter, space blanket, extra knife, fishing kit, needles, first aide kit etc etc  including food and water but when hunting also added a back pack with even more gear and extra clothes since it was normally much colder outdoors then

 

We were lucky to have a PE teacher in high school that was a serious hunter and still is to this day and remained one of my good friends

He offered a map and compass course in school and later I took one with my brothers that Paul V was involved in so may have been the course you were involved in

A compass is not a lot of weight to carry IMO nor is a fanny pack

 

I tossed my cell phone and pager when I stopped work 16 years ago and never any regrets

After one carrys one for work 24/7 all their life and had to sleep with it under their pillow for the late call outs one grows to hate them

The faces I get today when they ask my cell phone number is priceless. Sorry I don't own one I say

Yes I am an old prehistoric dude so they think but working for HP I had a form of a cell phone long before they were cool and available to most

Funny part is one can live just fine without one biggrin.png biggrin.png unless you are my wife or kids

Cheers


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#27 greybeard

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Posted 21 November 2020 - 08:54 AM

Well said. I have always been the same and go no where with out a leatherman and if even out for a walk in the woods a buck knife . Any hunting or fishing I did always carried what I called my survival fanny pack as a min with everything matches, lighter, space blanket, extra knife, fishing kit, needles, first aide kit etc etc  including food and water but when hunting also added a back pack with even more gear and extra clothes since it was normally much colder outdoors then

 

We were lucky to have a PE teacher in high school that was a serious hunter and still is to this day and remained one of my good friends

He offered a map and compass course in school and later I took one with my brothers that Paul V was involved in so may have been the course you were involved in

A compass is not a lot of weight to carry IMO nor is a fanny pack

 

I tossed my cell phone and pager when I stopped work 16 years ago and never any regrets

After one carrys one for work 24/7 all their life and had to sleep with it under their pillow for the late call outs one grows to hate them

The faces I get today when they ask my cell phone number is priceless. Sorry I don't own one I say

Yes I am an old prehistoric dude so they think but working for HP I had a form of a cell phone long before they were cool and available to most

Funny part is one can live just fine without one biggrin.png biggrin.png unless you are my wife or kids

Cheers

I understand completely, I have had a cell phone for work, way before they became an extension of everyone's arm.

When I retire it will be the first thing to go.


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Insanity/Hunting...doing the same thing over and over again hoping for a different outcome.

#28 3macs1

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Posted 21 November 2020 - 09:07 AM

I understand completely, I have had a cell phone for work, way before they became an extension of everyone's arm.

When I retire it will be the first thing to go.

It is the best thing I have ever did since retiring and you will see the same when you toss yours

Daughter says I am falling behind. From what I say?? I am very happy doing things the old way

Yes I have a very modern computer and upgrade about every 4/5 years that I need but not a cell phone

She came home all upset yesterday with the price of a new phone . We told her that we would upgrade hers for xmas which is what she wanted .

I been told her 120 gig XR I phone is old now wacko.png which I am sure is only a couple of years out but her mom has a IP 11 so she has to do better blink.png

Cheers


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#29 Joyrider

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Posted 21 November 2020 - 01:34 PM

I find myself lazy in my compass usage now.  I always have it of course, but rarely take a starting bearing like I used to (going into new woods I mean).  

I know I have the phone and have used it many times navigating new areas (satellite view has saved a lot of scouting time over the years!).  

I know that makes the compass less useful (not having the starting bearing I mean), but it'd still get me out (eventuaLLY!) if I needed it.  :-)


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#30 1NSH Dave

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Posted 21 November 2020 - 04:49 PM

I find myself lazy in my compass usage now. I always have it of course, but rarely take a starting bearing like I used to (going into new woods I mean).

I know I have the phone and have used it many times navigating new areas (satellite view has saved a lot of scouting time over the years!).

I know that makes the compass less useful (not having the starting bearing I mean), but it'd still get me out (eventuaLLY!) if I needed it. :-)


I often don’t think to take a beating before going in either, but just having a little bit of situational awareness is helpful. Like knowing which way roads run near where you’re going. Even things as simple as knowing hwy 102 runs N/S, 104 W/E. or remembering that you had the sun rising on your right shoulder When you entered off the road would tell you that you headed N going in so your road is to the S.

I learned all my military navigation by Being good at using natural features as backstops and borders. And the same idea goes for getting out of the woods. The goal is to get to the end, whether it’s in a straight line or not is not so important. I’ve seen many troops get lost by staring at their compass the whole walk trying to keep on one straight bearing. Lol. They walk right across a trail that should have told them they went too far but their eyes are glued to the compass needle.
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Time to start hunting them coyotes, I think!!!!

#31 Joyrider

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Posted 21 November 2020 - 05:29 PM

I often don’t think to take a beating before going in either, but just having a little bit of situational awareness is helpful. Like knowing which way roads run near where you’re going. Even things as simple as knowing hwy 102 runs N/S, 104 W/E. or remembering that you had the sun rising on your right shoulder When you entered off the road would tell you that you headed N going in so your road is to the S.

I learned all my military navigation by Being good at using natural features as backstops and borders. And the same idea goes for getting out of the woods. The goal is to get to the end, whether it’s in a straight line or not is not so important. I’ve seen many troops get lost by staring at their compass the whole walk trying to keep on one straight bearing. Lol. They walk right across a trail that should have told them they went too far but their eyes are glued to the compass needle.

Great point!   I wasn't staring at a compass but we did the same thing a couple of years back rabbit hunting.  We knew where the old road was, but it was grown up so bad we walked across it and had to backtrack a bit.  When we got to it and saw what we did, it was surprising!  With dusk or darkness we could see how you could really get lost in an area you thought you knew well.  :-)


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#32 Tripple D

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Posted 21 November 2020 - 06:57 PM

Hey Gary awesome landscape pics thanks for posting
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Everyone out there in NSH land have a super duper day and please store your guns in a safe manner 🇨🇦🏌️‍♀️🎱🦌🤠

#33 Tripple D

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Posted 21 November 2020 - 06:58 PM

Louisbear great story you’ve had some awesome hunting/ fishing trips. You should write a book !
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Everyone out there in NSH land have a super duper day and please store your guns in a safe manner 🇨🇦🏌️‍♀️🎱🦌🤠

#34 Tripple D

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Posted 21 November 2020 - 07:00 PM

Wow one simple question turns into a great informative thread.
Thanks to all for partaking and sharing your experiences and tips!
But hey don’t stop now keep em coming!
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Everyone out there in NSH land have a super duper day and please store your guns in a safe manner 🇨🇦🏌️‍♀️🎱🦌🤠

#35 labradort

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Posted 23 November 2020 - 11:09 PM

One thing I can rant against is buying government topographic maps.  I bought a couple last year thinking this is useful for use with a compass, and none of the roads I travel are on it.  Looked at the copyright: 1990's.  This is the most current! 

 

Backroads Map is much more up to date.  I have a compass and I mentally study the area I'm going to explore on the "NS Coordinate Referencing System Viewer" https://gis8.nsgc.gov.ns.ca/NSCRS/   

 

Sometimes I've got cell signal.  Also carry: 2 GPS (old one has crappy maps, but still can get you back to X,Y waypoint made at vehicle), spare GPS batteries, and battery booster pack for cell phone and GPS.  I carry 3 different devices to start a fire as well.  It is really too much, but I won't be that guy who left without a backpack for a stroll for 45 minutes outside camp, and got lost for 3 days (happened on Newfoundland west coast).


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#36 3macs1

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Posted 24 November 2020 - 06:50 AM

UvhGrQu.jpg


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#37 KEVIN

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Posted 24 November 2020 - 09:01 AM

The terrain you hunt always comes into play. If we were setting up to head into the woods for rabbits...usually there was 4 or 5 ...sometimes 7 or 8 of us...in an unknown area, I'd usually take a quick bearing of the road and call it out...any corner lots or areas with several logging or skidder roads...it was always a dual way out...like come out S and E/W or N & E/W...luckily and thankfully, no major issues in 45 + yrs of traipsing in the woods !


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If you take your kids hunting,.....You won't have to go hunting for your kids.....KS/85




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