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Nice video pete thanks for posting.
Spent some time up there this year. Couple big clearcuts on the “other road” . I went in that way and hid the bike and cross the brook at what we call the falls. Can’t get in from my end as the beavers have the road flooded, almost a lake at one point! We saw a lot of deer in there this year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2,603 ·
I have been trying to get some trail camera video at the feed towers and it has been difficult. I have two cameras set up for this effort. Mainly the weather hasn’t cooperated. Cold with snow for a few days, then warm with rain for a few days etc etc. The cameras are under cover, but snow still seems to fill in the camera lenses. Plus , swirling blowing snow in the open plots, misty nights, foggy nights, and some of those nights that are just extra dark due to cloud cover has resulted in limited results. Also, in all the years I have run supplemental feed in the winter, I have never seen such a group of nocturnal deer. There is no reason for them to be nocturnal. The plots are fairly remote and I’m only usually there once a week ? Usually by this time the deer are regularly visiting the feed in daylight hours. Deer browse continuously but stats indicate the they like to actively eat about every 6 hours and the feed is readily available ?? Of course, to date the winter has not been severe and there is plenty of browse on my property (that I have created). Also, there are some relatively new choppings (2 years old) in close proximity around my property that are just full of new browse. I put together a 1.5 min video of some of the video I have been able to get so far. >Pete

 

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Discussion Starter · #2,607 ·
Nice video pete thanks for posting.
Spent some time up there this year. Couple big clearcuts on the “other road” . I went in that way and hid the bike and cross the brook at what we call the falls. Can’t get in from my end as the beavers have the road flooded, almost a lake at one point! We saw a lot of deer in there this year.
Tripple D, The cutting back there just about drove me crazy last year (2020) as it was 24/7. Some of the cutting was pretty close to the back of my property. I have a location that I hunt that way and didn't hunt it at all due to the continuous noise of machines and trucks. They took anything they could get a 2x4 out of. It really disrupted what is a pretty tranquil place around the Camp. I took the bike back this year and yes there are some big clearcuts. Plus, I heard a lot of shots in that direction. >Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #2,608 ·
Some video clips I took with my phone during last fall. The quality of the video is either good or not so clear mostly depending on lighting conditions at the time. I saw a few grouse this season, and one VERY Cold morning I drove right up to 4 of them. It was almost like they were stunned by the sudden cold. Of course, no shot gun....lol. I had 3 coyote pups hang around the Camp all fall and I can’t believe how many apples they ate , probably due to the lack of small game. I picked off two of them. I probably did them a favour as they probably would have staved over the winter. Plus, I saw a number of bears (mostly juveniles)during the early fall. A spring hunt would be awesome. One evening I saw a group of 5 deer, it was awesome to see the population coming back ! Overall, I saw a pile of deer including the 6 intermediate bucks in this video. Unfortunately none of the really big bucks that were around presented a shot. They always seemed to be somewhere else when I was not.....lol. >Pete

 

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Great video, some nice looking, up and coming bucks
Thanks. I thought long and hard on the last one.....lol. But, there was still lots of season left and I knew there were bigger ones. Plus, that one would be a beauty next year. He is a backwoods buck so I hope he makes it . >Pete
 

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Hi Pete
Since I have a nice group of deer hanging around was thinking of getting some feed for them to help through the winter
What do you suggest
Thanks
Cut a hardwood tree down, don't feed them if they aren't used to getting fed. Their stomachs are used to woody browse right now. You feed them they can die with a full stomach cause they aren't used to digesting anything else.
 

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Cut a hardwood tree down, don't feed them if they aren't used to getting fed. Their stomachs are used to woody browse right now. You feed them they can die with a full stomach cause they aren't used to digesting anything else.
That is why I am asking Pete since I know he has a proven blend that doesn't hurt them ands tons of experience in this. I am not cutting trees in my yard
Dam:p I am not a beaver:p
 

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Discussion Starter · #2,617 ·
Hey Joe, Beaverhunter, I buy in bulk for the winter. Usually 1000lbs because it is way cheaper. It is a mixture of oats, dried molasses, and cracked corn. The Lands and Forrest recommends grains, usually oats etc if you are going to feed deer in the winter. They used to have a guideline on their site. If you want to mix up some feed yourself then I usually mix it 1/3 cracked corn to 2/3 oats. Go to the Coop Farm Store and get 2 bags "oats with molasses" and a bag of "cracked corn" if you want to mix it all at once. If not, then 1 scoop to 2 scoops in a bucket and mix it and put it out. Maybe just limit how much you put out at first. If you have a bird feeder and the deer are eating the seed, then they will eat this. During the deer season I will have some apples out and around mid Nov I will start to throw some feed right on top of the apples so they start to get used to it going into winter. I don't put feed out all year. They usually won't eat it when there is lots of green stuff around, but the bears love it......lol. When the bears show up in the spring, I stop the feed so the bears don't make my camp their home ! >Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #2,619 ·
Beaverhunter, NB does not have a very good track record when it comes to deer.....lol. Just ask Rod Cumberland. No question there are advantages and disadvantages to feeding deer. Right or wrong I prefer to feed. The main thing is that once you start it is a winter long commitment. Joe, this is from the NS Lands and Forrest. >Pete

The Advantage of Feeding Deer:

First we must ask ourselves, "Why do we want to feed deer?" If it is to make ourselves feel good or to see more deer from our kitchen window, perhaps we should reconsider. These are reasons for our benefit, not necessarily for the benefit of deer.

The main reason for feeding deer is to prevent a large die-off due to starvation.

Further, if deer make it to spring in relatively good condition, they are more likely to give birth to strong and healthy fawns with an increased chance of survival.

How to Properly Feed Deer:

A proper feeding program requires the following essential elements:

An efficient delivery system to get food to deer on an established trail network,

A method to deliver the food until the end of winter, and

An adequate supply of the right type of food.
Where to Feed:

First, make sure you have landowner permission before initiating any feeding program.

Deer must have good quality cover in close proximity to where the food is delivered. It may be tempting to feed them where it is most convenient or entertaining for ourselves. However, the wrong location could result in more harm than good.

Find where the deer are and what areas they are using as cover. This will likely mean using a snowmobile or walking with snowshoes. Remember, your searching may disturb and stress them which uses energy reserves.

If you don't find their network of trails, pack trails with snowshoes allowing the deer to approach and leave the feeding site from many directions.

What To Feed:

Natural winter food for deer consists primarily of woody browse from hardwood twigs and occasionally needles of balsam fir. The most preferred browse species include: sugar, red, mountain and striped maple; yellow and white birch, witch and beaked hazel and red oak.

Deer have problems with many diets that livestock consume easily. Deer depend on a variety of bacteria and microorganisms in their rumen (stomach) to break down food. A change in diet requires a change in the population of these microorganisms to process the new food properly. Other problems such as "acidosis" (excess acid buildup in the rumen) and scours (diarrhea) may occur if they are given cereal grains. It is therefore important to gradually introduce artificial feed in an area where natural food is also available.

1. Natural Food. If possible, it is best to feed natural food. To do this, cut down a few of the preferred hardwood trees mentioned above. Again, make a number of trails from the new feed to their cover area. Check these trees every few days and turn them so all the branches can be used. The number of trees needed and when to provide more will depend on how many deer there are in the area. In the spring/summer, you can return and cut the same trees for firewood. By doing this you are not only immediately providing food to the deer, but over the next few years a large number of suckers will grow from the stumps and other shrubs and saplings will grow in the clearing you have created. Both short term and long term feeding is accomplished.

2. Deer Pellets. Most farm feed outlets carry a specially formulated ration for deer or can tell you where it can be bought. This feed is specially formulated for deer with consideration of their energy, protein and fiber needs, as well as digestibility. At first deer may not recognize these pellets as food but if introduced with small amounts of corn, oats or alfalfa, they will gradually become accustomed to the new food.

3. Cereal Grains. Although not as well balanced a diet as Deer Pellets, rolled oats or coarsely milled oats are easily digested and reduce the possibility of problems associated with a sudden diet change. Whole corn and whole oats can also be used and are often readily available. A ratio of 1:1 to 1:4 corn:eek:ats is recommended.

Avoid feeding pure corn, barley or wheat as they are too high in starch and may cause digestive problems leading to death.

As with pellets, these foods can be placed in handful amounts on well packed snow� preferably under conifer trees to prevent being covered with snow. Once the deer have become accustomed to this type of feed, it can be delivered by laying feed bags on the ground and cutting a large panel out on the top side. This will keep the feed together and off the ground, reducing waste. Hoppers like those used to feed domestic cattle or sheep, may also be used.

4. Hay or Alfalfa. Caution should be used when feeding hay or alfalfa as deer (especially when in starved condition) may have problems digesting them. Introduce this feed gradually and ensure natural foods are also available.

5. Fruit & Vegetables. Although deer will eat apples, carrots, cabbage, etc., their use is not recommended. They are like candy to a child� tasty but of little value in providing a well-balanced and nutritious diet.

As can be seen, feeding is not just a matter of throwing a few bread crusts off the back porch. If you want to feed deer effectively (to their benefit) ensure you do it properly with the energy and resources to continue until the end of winter.

Other Recommendations:

Start early in winter to allow deer the ability to find and become accustomed to the new feed and for their rumen microorganisms to adjust.
Use the same feed throughout winter.
Provide food at a number of locations to ensure all have a chance to feed. This will also minimize aggression.
Keep the feed dry if using pellets or cereal grains. Wet feed will likely not be consumed.
Ensure a constant supply of feed is provided. Check after each snowfall that the feed is not covered.
Increase the amount of feed available in late winter when need is the greatest and activity levels have increased.
As spring approaches and snow is no longer deep, or if deer are no longer coming to the site, feeding should be discontinued.
It is a difficult and expensive task to feed deer in winter, and it may not achieve the desired results. However, if you decide to take up the challenge, by following this advice, deer should realize the most benefit.
For more information on feeding deer in winter or woodlot management for the benefit of deer and other wildlife, contact the Department of Lands and Forestry Wildlife Biologist for your area.

Any Questions? Contact Lands and Forestry News Search Privacy Terms Cookies
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Page last updated 2018-08-14.
 

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Hey Joe, Beaverhunter, I buy in bulk for the winter. Usually 1000lbs because it is way cheaper. It is a mixture of oats, dried molasses, and cracked corn. The Lands and Forrest recommends grains, usually oats etc if you are going to feed deer in the winter. They used to have a guideline on their site. If you want to mix up some feed yourself then I usually mix it 1/3 cracked corn to 2/3 oats. Go to the Coop Farm Store and get 2 bags "oats with molasses" and a bag of "cracked corn" if you want to mix it all at once. If not, then 1 scoop to 2 scoops in a bucket and mix it and put it out. Maybe just limit how much you put out at first. If you have a bird feeder and the deer are eating the seed, then they will eat this. During the deer season I will have some apples out and around mid Nov I will start to throw some feed right on top of the apples so they start to get used to it going into winter. I don't put feed out all year. They usually won't eat it when there is lots of green stuff around, but the bears love it......lol. When the bears show up in the spring, I stop the feed so the bears don't make my camp their home ! >Pete
Thank you Pete
I have the cracked corn in the big bags use it for bluejays and the odd grouse that shows up . At one time pheasants but have not seen one of those in like 4 years now
I have to head to the coop next week to pay for the greenhouse soil so will pick up the rest

I am not trying to feed the deer to help them they are in great shape or for the mrs to take pics of them
This year they are eating the hell out of my 20 plus apple and fruit trees and if I don't do something to get them out of the yard I will have no trees left
I hope I can help them with the feed to hang out more over towards where I have the garden and away from my trees especially the honey crisp which they love those apples and now their branches and I am not talking eating just little twigs here
I have never seen them do such damage and these trees have been there some 20 years
Thanks again Joe
 
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