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So I think to clarify, Hunters Orange is absolutely required during small game hunting. Pretty much from October 1 onwards I wear my orange.
 

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Wendigo if you want to meeting a club of hunters and fishers, come to a HWWA meeting on the first Wed of every month on bog road in Falmouth. You had a few of the members replying to your post. We teach both the hunter safety and the PAL courses. And have range days and an upcoming Fall Classic bird hunt and a lot more. Ps all free. I hunt with supersciky:) both bunnies and deer. Ps there is a place on the site and on Facebook.Ps typing with power flicking tonight.
 

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Hello everyone,

I'm Jim, I'm 50 and I've never been hunting. I have several firearms and an RPAL. So far I've only been honing my marksmanship at the range. I just completed the hunter safety course and will soon receive the wildlife card.
I'm just interested in learning to live off the land, field dress an animal, process it etc.
I guess I'm wondering where a good place to begin might be? What's my next step as far as what licence/ stamp? What's a good animal to start with and so on. The government websites are exactly clear about what I need and when and where I can hunt and with which firearm. Maybe there's a group that I could join where I could go along with experienced hunters?
Also can I take a flint and steel in the woods instead of waterproof matches?

Thanks for any advice you can give .

Jim
Jim, some great feedback to your question already. I recently moved back to Canada and have a great passion for the sport. I just finished the “Furharvester” course which was great. Coyote are year round with no bag limit, but to sell pelts you need the Furharvester course. They have a mentorship program as well which I have signed up for. Learn on a day what would take a year on your own to absorb. I was fortunate in getting drawn for a moose tag this year in zone 5. You need the wildlife habitat tag as a base. I have small game, deer and bear in my booklet. Just to find the time to use all! Rebuilding arsenal. Big game Winchester 70 chambered in 6.5 Creedmoor and a Ruger 10/22 lefty competition for small game and trap line. Best of luck! Regards, JCG
 

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Thanks for the help. Just one more thing ...there must be a rule about how far away from the road i have to be to shoot. Right? So if I find a spot and park, i must have to walk in a certain distance. Sorry for all the questions, I've been in the woods my whole life, and I disassemble guns, clean them, and I'm a great marksman. Just never happened to go hunting
You've got to read the hunting regulations handbook that comes with the license. It answers all these questions. The redo they did on the guide this year makes information like this easy to see in chart format.

I recommend this NS mapping site (on a computer, not a phone) to see how the land is set up and how far one might be from buildings and roads.
https://gis8.nsgc.gov.ns.ca/NSCRS/

Turn off Survey Monuments, zoom in, and then turn on 10K Orthos. You will usually see more detail than on google maps. I would also recommend using Backroads of NS map or GPS products (works with Garmin only) to help you get around and not get lost.

If you're not hunting some land owned by someone you know with easy access, you need to look at hunting the woods roads, which are rough and take off body parts of regular cars with regular frequency. A vehicle with good ground clearance, or a dedicated ATV are the best way to go about it.

In Kings County, there are very few opportunities to be situated more than the minimum 407 yards or metres from buildings (for rifle), so you'll likely move inland. Many of us do the same thing, and sometimes it's a little crowded on roads like Butler Rd, the gateway to forestry land coming from Kentville and area.

If you think you'll save some money by hunting, forget it. Unless you already live next to a wilderness area and can do it all by foot, you'll spend hundreds of dollars in gas, gear, and possibly food bait materials if you're hunting deer or bear. Subsistence hunting is mainly a relic of the past for most people.
 

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Crown load map is a good resource. But not all are suitable for hunting. Just check before making too many plans. e.g. McNabs Island, Cape Split and Blomidon Provincial park are all shaded crown land.
 

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Crown load map is a good resource. But not all are suitable for hunting. Just check before making too many plans. e.g. McNabs Island, Cape Split and Blomidon Provincial park are all shaded crown land.
Definitely. This is why I like OSMAND as it lists the provincial parks (No hunting in provincial parks). There are issues with OSM data in general, especially with consistency. One I noticed today was trying to find Access Nova Scotia in Truro. Most Access Nova Scotia places are listed as Access Nova Scotia in OSM, but Truro is Access NS. Fun.
 

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You've got to read the hunting regulations handbook that comes with the license. It answers all these questions. The redo they did on the guide this year makes information like this easy to see in chart format.

I recommend this NS mapping site (on a computer, not a phone) to see how the land is set up and how far one might be from buildings and roads.
https://gis8.nsgc.gov.ns.ca/NSCRS/

Turn off Survey Monuments, zoom in, and then turn on 10K Orthos. You will usually see more detail than on google maps. I would also recommend using Backroads of NS map or GPS products (works with Garmin only) to help you get around and not get lost.

If you're not hunting some land owned by someone you know with easy access, you need to look at hunting the woods roads, which are rough and take off body parts of regular cars with regular frequency. A vehicle with good ground clearance, or a dedicated ATV are the best way to go about it.

In Kings County, there are very few opportunities to be situated more than the minimum 407 yards or metres from buildings (for rifle), so you'll likely move inland. Many of us do the same thing, and sometimes it's a little crowded on roads like Butler Rd, the gateway to forestry land coming from Kentville and area.

If you think you'll save some money by hunting, forget it. Unless you already live next to a wilderness area and can do it all by foot, you'll spend hundreds of dollars in gas, gear, and possibly food bait materials if you're hunting deer or bear. Subsistence hunting is mainly a relic of the past for most people.
This is a great map! Thanks for posting the link. It allowed me to make sure the area I hunt often is in fact crown land. My only small issue with using it to determine if you are too close to houses, etcetera is that the satellite image(s), well at least one of them so I suspect many of them, are 4 or 5 years old at least. I can tell that by looking at the satellite image of a property known to me in the Malagash area. A lot of new houses and cottages have been built around the province over the last few years and therefore you can't rely solely on the map and satellite images. Google Earth images are more recent, but, you need to get boots on the ground to make sure you don't end up breaking the law.
 

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You can measure distances on Google maps and Google Earth (and in osmand) and you know they aren't building houses on crown land so you can just measure in from the border to get a safe buffer.
I do that and it works great of course. But, when looking at private land, if a satellite picture is old you would not realize that someone had built a building since the image was taken.
 

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Woods are woods private property or not posted or not doesn’t matter you can legally hunt there.
 
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