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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How Nova Scotia plans to make the province a sportfishing destination

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Minister says there has been no real effort to grow the sportfishing industry

brittany-wentzell.jpg

Brittany Wentzell · CBC ·

Posted: May 25, 2021 6:00 AM AT | Last Updated: 3 hours ago

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Fishing guide Gioia Stanley casting a line. (Scotty Sherin)

Nova Scotia wants to make the province a sportfishing destination.

This fall, the provincial government plans to launch a new long-term program called Fish Nova Scotia. The hope is to attract tourists through sportfishing, whether it's on the ocean, a lake, or in brooks and streams.

"We are very excited about this. For many, many years there was no real effort to grow our sportfishing industry in Nova Scotia," said Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture Keith Colwell.

Fishing of all kinds will be included in the plan, including tuna, bass, trout and salmon.

The Fisheries and Aquaculture Department is also working with Tourism Nova Scotia on the project. The province has been consulting with businesses and fishing guides and has been developing a website to help businesses connect with each other.

Sustainability is key: local fishing guide

The hope is businesses will work together to create packages to entice visitors to spend more time in Nova Scotia.

"This is going to be really high end activities that we can have people come and enjoy the province, not just the fishing, but also maybe go to a winery... or have a round of golf," said Colwell.

But Cape Breton fishing guide Clifford Paul has some concerns about increasing pressure on ecosystems and fish stocks.

Paul works with the Unama'ki Institute of Natural Resources and fishes to provide food for his community of Membertou.

"I know our sport fishery is world class, we want to keep it that way, and we're going to have to strike a balance between how the locals approach this resource and how we are going to share it," said Paul.

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Gioa Stanley is a fishing guide in Baddeck. (Jeff Stanley)

Paul said the province should consult with Mi'kmaq communities as well as local anglers to get a better sense of fish stocks.

However, Paul sees potential in the idea if it's sustainable. He believes Mi'kmaq guides could develop their own packages that would introduce visitors to their culture and heritage, while also using resources in a sustainable way.

Colwell hopes a focus on sportfishing will bring back a style of tourism that was once popular in Nova Scotia in the early 1900s.

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Fly fishing instructor and guide Justin Lovell casting in the Margaree River. (Contributed by Justin Lovell)

Fishing and hunting guides would take wealthy visitors into Nova Scotia's forests for multi-day trips. Author Albert Bigelow Paine once spent weeks with Mi'kmaq guides in Kejimkujik National Park, inspiring him to write The Tent Dwellers.

Colwell said the province has been offering a new guiding course to help enhance the experience of visitors.

Gioia Stanley, a fishing guide from Baddeck, N.S., is keen on the idea. She believes the province has a lot to offer visitors.

"We have so many rivers - prominent salmon rivers here in Cape Breton and in Nova Scotia," she said. "We have the Bras d'Or Lake, which is open all year round and presents a lot of different opportunities, whether it be fishing from a boat, fishing from the shore, or ice fishing."

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Mason Burke holds a catch up to the camera. (Donald Halfpenny)

Anglers also say they're willing to share their favourite fishing holes with visitors.

"It's such an untapped resource for us. I can't believe how many people aren't on our famous rivers when I go there," said Mason Burke, an angler from Sydney, N.S., who operates multiple fishing groups on social media.

It's unclear how much it will cost to launch the program, but a spokesperson for the Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture said it will cost $200,000 a year to run Fish Nova Scotia.

A tender has been issued looking for promotional material for the program.

Colwell said they will be marketing the program internationally, doing things like trade shows in other countries, similar to the work that's been done to expand Nova Scotia's seafood exports.
Such a timely article for me as I just finished a book written about NS being a hunting/fishing destination in the early 1900's. The province was abound with wildlife, lodges and guides. You would have Americans coming up from Boston to hunt and fish at that time.
 

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Do you recall around 84 or 85 the group of american pro bass fishermen that came up and wanted to do a huge amount of investment and positive change to the brador lakes in the beneoin area

Wanted to have fishing tournaments, stock native fish , build hotels and a new boat marina and create new jobs

I remember the year since one of the group was a friend of my brother from west virginia and they drove back to kentucky together

Idiots here stropped it cold and one of those groups is the same group as seems to be crowing now about a food source being impacted
rolleyes.gif


I hope things have changed and people will have and an open mind this time

I remember even back then him saying no where in the world would there be an opportunity like we have here for world class fishing tournaments and not developed as such

Cheers
 

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So has there been a boom in salmon stocks. How about wild trout. Don't even get me started on the striped bass.
Sure back in the early 1900's there were lots of fish heck we even had lots of moose and caribou back then too.
Better revive the fish number six first.
 
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kudos to those who worked, for many years, at getting government to finally do somethng about showing off Nova Scotia as an outdoors destination.

we have lots to offer here - maybe not a wilderness fish however when combined with other activities, a person could make some interesting trips - a few that come to mind;

  • bay of fundy. Experiencing that huge rise of water in such a short period of time while trying to catch a striper. After the fishing, heading to a winery tour and gourmet dinner.
  • steaming out on the ocean at daybreak, bouncing around on the waves in search of shark or other salt water fish, with water ALL around you.
  • bank fishing or wading, in deep pools on a river, casting for shad. Toss in a shore lunch to add to the experience. FYI - Ive met a cpl statesiders who come here religiously, each Spring for shad - too crowded, they say, where theyre from.
  • go for a kayak trip, in mid-Summer, in several places where houses or cottages do NOT line the shores and catch a few of those voracious smallmouth bass on top water lures/flies.
  • many places, in our beauty Province where you can spend a cpl hrs catching wild brookies.
  • a Fall combo fishing & bear hunt can be done pretty well Province wide - trout, salmon & smallmouth bass seasons overlap our bear season.

Lots of opportunities to get out fish and especially if you combine it with the many other gifts this Province has to offer.
 

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In my short life time we were known world wide for the salmon fishing on the margaree and fishermen flocked here to share the experience

The cape was also a yearly destination for many americans and canadians who enjoyed white tail deer hunting and many guides and outfitters were here making a living off of both that including Thunderstick I think. Even in my little bubble every year boys from PEI would come and trade us a goose hunt for a whitetail hunt and boys from northern ontario for a moose hunt

I have not been with these groups since the late 90's since they don't want to come here any more with the shape the deer are in on the cape vs what they experienced for years here

They F'ked both the salmon and deer the governments over the years and now both activities are on life support and the visits from those outside the province pretty much stopped or close to it . Most guides and outfitters had to find another way to make a living or move

Today we are known as the province NOT to move to if you are into hunting and fishing and the least supportive of gun owners

Prove this wrong and name one with as few opportunities I can't. I hear it all the time from guys moving back from western canada who left 30 or 40 years ago. Like one says he went from eating 95% wild game to maybe 5% and had to give up three gun shooting since it doesn't even exist here

They have a huge hill to climb to get back even to where we once were which would be wonderful and any effort cannot hurt and is appreciated

We have low hanging fruit like spring bear hunting and turkey introduction but not even smart enough to pick it

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So has there been a boom in salmon stocks. How about wild trout. Don't even get me started on the striped bass.
Sure back in the early 1900's there were lots of fish heck we even had lots of moose and caribou back then too.
Better revive the fish number six first.
Part of the reason the caribou herds were impacted in NS was from the spread of the white tailed deer, they suffer from the same brain worm problems as the moose apparently. The whitetail spread from increased logging and how the habitat changed from that. They tried to re-introduce caribou in the late 60's early 70's and they didn't survive.

I just started and finished this neat little read a few days ago.

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1520147163/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

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Part of the reason the caribou herds were impacted in NS was from the spread of the white tailed deer, they suffer from the same brain worm problems as the moose apparently. The whitetail spread from increased logging and how the habitat changed from that. They tried to re-introduce caribou in the late 60's early 70's and they didn't survive.

I just started and finished this neat little read a few days ago.

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1520147163/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Yes I know and the caribou we're a poor example on my part.
Thanks for the link!
 

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kudos to those who worked, for many years, at getting government to finally do somethng about showing off Nova Scotia as an outdoors destination.

we have lots to offer here - maybe not a wilderness fish however when combined with other activities, a person could make some interesting trips - a few that come to mind;

  • bay of fundy. Experiencing that huge rise of water in such a short period of time while trying to catch a striper. After the fishing, heading to a winery tour and gourmet dinner.
  • steaming out on the ocean at daybreak, bouncing around on the waves in search of shark or other salt water fish, with water ALL around you.
  • bank fishing or wading, in deep pools on a river, casting for shad. Toss in a shore lunch to add to the experience. FYI - Ive met a cpl statesiders who come here religiously, each Spring for shad - too crowded, they say, where theyre from.
  • go for a kayak trip, in mid-Summer, in several places where houses or cottages do NOT line the shores and catch a few of those voracious smallmouth bass on top water lures/flies.
  • many places, in our beauty Province where you can spend a cpl hrs catching wild brookies.
  • a Fall combo fishing & bear hunt can be done pretty well Province wide - trout, salmon & smallmouth bass seasons overlap our bear season.
Lots of opportunities to get out fish and especially if you combine it with the many other gifts this Province has to offer.
Yes lots to offer and good for tourism but as for fishing salmon not gonna happen I would not even agree to non residents catch and release with our current stocks. Stripers maybe but look at where those stocks are now compared to years ago. Trout catch and release only AND barbless only! Plus NO NONE RESIDENTS IN OUR WILDERNESS AREAS! I hope my grandchildren and great grandchildren have at least a few safe havens to fish here in NS. I think you are close to my age and I'm sure you remember fishing as a teenager, I know I do and in many spots 2-3 lb trout were the norm with few bigger ones in the mix. Not so much anymore!
 

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But hey let them come catch all the pickerel they want!
 

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Part of the reason the caribou herds were impacted in NS was from the spread of the white tailed deer, they suffer from the same brain worm problems as the moose apparently. The whitetail spread from increased logging and how the habitat changed from that. They tried to re-introduce caribou in the late 60's early 70's and they didn't survive.

I just started and finished this neat little read a few days ago.

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1520147163/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Yes and not only the worm. Two small racks hang in a shed I know of that his grandfather shot :(
 

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Too bad they are not what ontario call pickerel. One of the best eating fish out there IMO the yanks call walleye
Cheers
Walleye= perch family
Pickerel=pike family

Sorry but fresh salmon and trout are the best tasting
 

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Nova Scotia sucks when it comes to stocking and rehabbing programs !!

Hatcheries shut down..gub'ment departments closed, so no egg production in other vital spots in the province to be able to release the well started fingerlings / smolts.

I've had the good fortune to fish fresh water and salt water species(where I could) in every province of this country...including NWT ! Good ol NS can't hold a candle to the other provinces !

BC has an awesome fish stocking program. Minimum / maximum size limits on most inland waters..daily or weekly closures sometimes on some of the great salmon rivers to allow the salmon to get thru for a better chance to spawn.

LOTS OF ENFORCEMENT officers patrolling the province. Lakes with NO COMBUSTIBLE ENGINES ALLOWED on them...PERIOD.

Any freshwater steelhead, rainbow, laker, that has been caught, and has the adipose fin on it HAS to be released ! All the hatchery reared fish have their small fins clipped...they never grow back and this easily seen identifying mark tells the anglers that it's a hatchery fish, and may be retained as long as it meets the size requirements. ALL fish with the small fins still on them are illegal to retain...shows that they are the successful wild bred.

I've seen numerous trucks hauling raised salmon to be released...some tractor trailers with the big tanks will locate to an area where the smaller 4 x 4 truck / w / tanks can take them to remote places to be released.

All the salt water marinas (Brentwood Bay, Pedder Bay, Port Alberni, Comox, Masset, Prince Rupert)...just to name a few, have cleaning stations set up which were monitored almost daily for retained salmon samples..other tests, lice conditions...it's amazing really how much effort went in to this resource. Annnd OH BOY...what a great resource it is !

This was back in the day when I was moving families from coast to coast. Sometimes we'd have to wait for a week or two to reload back for home so I had ample time to partake ! My buddy I stayed with in Victoria and Masset , would pressure can all my salmon I caught so I could bring it home with me. I had a few small mom n pop bakeries picked out along the way so I could grab a loaf , hit a rest area, get the coleman stove out enjoy a mug up.

I never EVER came home with the same amount of canned salmon I left with...LOL....Dammmm I miss those days
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
If you can properly debone a chain pickrel they are good eating, white and flakey. Just need to get the chinese liking them and they will be on the endangered species list.
 

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Right on Kevin- hunting and fishing in this province are just for the cash grab. No conservation restocking etc from our government
Never been stopped or even seen any enforcement people in all my years fishing. And I fish down sheet harbour way a lot with DLF offices on both sides and they do a lot of travelling back and forth between the two. CO's in the hunting season have been non existent in the last few years as well.
 

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So heres a ques since salmon is catch and release do you need a salmon license anymore because all the rivers usually have trout in them as well.Lol i read a quote from the female guide in the article saying the locals would be willing to share there honey holes with visiters **** i nearly laughed myself off the chair maybe for a price lol...I might get my guide ticket if that starts to happen...
 

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Some where in the basement I have some unused salmon tags and now seems like it was from a different life time

Will we ever see that again in NS NOPE IMHO even though we have more tree huggers that ever . One would think the stocks should be growing with all the great work and measure put in place over the years

Can anyone remember when we were allowed to keep a salmon. I am guessing early 80's

Could look for the tags I guess there will be a date on them I think

Cheers
 
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