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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Wrentzel was not wearing hunter orange clothing, according to three sources with knowledge of the investigation who were not authorized to speak about it. But hunter orange laws only apply to hunters, not to others in the woods. "As far as what she may have been wearing that particular day, she's under no obligation as a landowner to have to wear anything," said Jon Spofford, who also said family members had spent some time reading through hunting laws on Wednesday. "We were looking them up today. You need to see the head of the animal and the torso," Jon Spofford said. "So yeah, there's a certain amount of anger. The man did not intend to shoot Karen. But he definitely made a reckless shot, and it ended tragically."

http://bangordailynews.com/2017/11/03/outdoors/she-didnt-come-back-grandmother-remembers-woman-killed-by-hunter/
 

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Wrentzel was not wearing hunter orange clothing, according to three sources with knowledge of the investigation who were not authorized to speak about it. But hunter orange laws only apply to hunters, not to others in the woods. "As far as what she may have been wearing that particular day, wear anyshe's under no obligation as a landowner to have to wear anything," said Jon Spofford, who also said family members had spent some time reading through hunting laws on Wednesday. "We were looking them up today. You need to see the head of the animal and the torso," Jon Spofford said. "So yeah, there's a certain amount of anger. The man did not intend to shoot Karen. But he definitely made a reckless shot, and it ended tragically."

http://bangordailynews.com/2017/11/03/outdoors/she-didnt-come-back-grandmother-remembers-woman-killed-by-hunter/
Nor should she. She is not participating in hunting and it is her land

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Another incident occurred in 1988, when Karen Wood of Hermon was fatally shot while standing in her backyard. Initially, a grand jury refused to indict hunter Donald Rogerson of Bangor, but another grand jury did hand up an indictment. Rogerson was tried in 1990 and found not guilty of manslaughter. Wood's death and Rogerson's acquittal prompted Maine lawmakers to examine hunting laws. Seven months after Rogerson's trial, a new law was passed outlining the conduct expected of responsible hunters. Among those requirements: Hunters are required to identify various parts of an animal before pulling the trigger and must know what lies beyond the target.

http://bangordailynews.com/2017/11/04/outdoors/hunter-related-shooting-deaths-of-nonhunters-rare-in-maine/
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Hunter charged with manslaughter in shooting of Hebron woman

Robert Trundy, 38, said he could see "what he thought was the 'ass of a deer' with a tail, skinny legs and a possible glimpse of what he thought could have been part of a head or antler of a deer," according to a sworn affidavit written by District Game Warden Anthony Gray. Asked if he saw the outline of a deer, "Robert stated no," Gray's affidavit said. "At no point did Robert have an essentially unobstructed view of the head and torso of a deer," Gray wrote in his affidavit. According to Maine law, "a hunter may not shoot at a target without, at that point in time, being certain that it is the wild animal … sought." Gray wrote that he "observed that it was nearly impossible to observe and identify a human form, even when dressed in hunter orange," if that person were to stand where Wrentzel had been when she was fatally shot and the shooter were to stand where the shell casing was found. Trundy told Gray he had stood at that spot when he pulled the trigger, roughly 100 yards away. Trundy shot a Browning semi-automatic 30-06 caliber rifle with no scope, Gray wrote. Trundy heard a scream after he fired. The hunter "thought to himself, 'deer don't do that,' " the warden's affidavit said. After Trundy had walked about three-quarters of the way to Wrentzel, he saw a rake leaning against a rock. "It was at that point he thought that he had shot someone," Gray wrote. Trundy couldn't bring himself to walk the rest of the distance to Wrentzel, he told Gray. "Honestly, I couldn't go down there," he told Gray. "If I don't see it, it's out of my mind." Trundy phoned his father, who was hunting in the area, to say he thought he had just shot someone. Ralph Trundy, 69, told a warden he instructed his son to "go look" at his target, because "if it was a person, he had to call 911." Ralph Trundy walked to where his son had seen the rake and discovered Wrentzel's unresponsive body. He told his son to call 911. Rolling Wrentzel's body over, Ralph Trundy said he could see a wound on her hip and tried to stop the bleeding. He attempted CPR. According the affidavit, Robert Trundy said it took his father three to four minutes to arrive, but Ralph Trundy told Gray it took him about 10 to 15 minutes to reach the scene where Wrentzel was shot.

http://www.pressherald.com/2017/11/07/hunter-in-fatal-hebron-shooting-charged-with-manslaughter/
 

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Bail set at $2,500 for hunter in death of Hebron woman

Bail was set at $2,500 cash Wednesday for the hunter charged with manslaughter in the shooting death of a Hebron woman on the opening day of deer season for Maine residents. Robert Trundy, 38, of Hebron is charged with shooting Karen Wrentzel, 34, who died on her property near 490 Greenwood Mountain Road after being shot at about 10:30 a.m. on Oct. 28. Trundy's target screamed after he fired the shot. Trundy suspected he had shot someone, but he couldn't bring himself to walk the rest of the way to Wrentzel. "Honestly, I couldn't go down there," he told District Game Warden Anthony Gray. "If I don't see it, it's out of my mind." The next day, Chief Medical Examiner Mark Flomenbaum determined the manner of death was homicide and the cause of death was a gunshot wound of the lower torso. Flomenbaum found extensive fractures of the pelvis and lacerations of major arteries. Beverly Spofford, Wrentzel's grandmother, said after the hearing that she was "very angry." "He heard her scream," Spofford said. "The affidavit says all this. Why didn't he go down there and say, 'I'm sorry,' or something?" She said she didn't know whether anything would have been different if he had administered aid to Wrentzel. Assistant Attorney General Robert "Bud" Ellis said the state hopes to present the case to a grand jury in December. Bail conditions for Trundy include no use or possession of firearms, bows or other dangerous weapons, no hunting, and no contact with witnesses in the case.

http://www.pressherald.com/2017/11/08/bail-set-at-2500-for-hunter-in-death-of-hebron-woman/
 

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Hunter charged with manslaughter in shooting of Hebron woman

Robert Trundy, 38, said he could see "what he thought was the 'ass of a deer' with a tail, skinny legs and a possible glimpse of what he thought could have been part of a head or antler of a deer," according to a sworn affidavit written by District Game Warden Anthony Gray. Asked if he saw the outline of a deer, "Robert stated no," Gray's affidavit said. "At no point did Robert have an essentially unobstructed view of the head and torso of a deer," Gray wrote in his affidavit. According to Maine law, "a hunter may not shoot at a target without, at that point in time, being certain that it is the wild animal … sought." Gray wrote that he "observed that it was nearly impossible to observe and identify a human form, even when dressed in hunter orange," if that person were to stand where Wrentzel had been when she was fatally shot and the shooter were to stand where the shell casing was found. Trundy told Gray he had stood at that spot when he pulled the trigger, roughly 100 yards away. Trundy shot a Browning semi-automatic 30-06 caliber rifle with no scope, Gray wrote. Trundy heard a scream after he fired. The hunter "thought to himself, 'deer don't do that,' " the warden's affidavit said. After Trundy had walked about three-quarters of the way to Wrentzel, he saw a rake leaning against a rock. "It was at that point he thought that he had shot someone," Gray wrote. Trundy couldn't bring himself to walk the rest of the distance to Wrentzel, he told Gray. "Honestly, I couldn't go down there," he told Gray. ee it, "If I don't see it ,it's out of my mind." Trundy phoned his father, who was hunting in the area, to say he thought he had just shot someone. Ralph Trundy, 69, told a warden he instructed his son to "go look" at his target, because "if it was a person, he had to call 911." Ralph Trundy walked to where his son had seen the rake and discovered Wrentzel's unresponsive body. He told his son to call 911. Rolling Wrentzel's body over, Ralph Trundy said he could see a wound on her hip and tried to stop the bleeding. He attempted CPR. According the affidavit, Robert Trundy said it took his father three to four minutes to arrive, but Ralph Trundy told Gray it took him about 10 to 15 minutes to reach the scene where Wrentzel was shot.

http://www.pressherald.com/2017/11/07/hunter-in-fatal-hebron-shooting-charged-with-manslaughter/
WTF is that. Shoot someone and don't even see if you can help. I hope he gets what is left in his life in prison since he is beyond an idiot

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Yikes. It is chilling to hear the details. Really sad for the woman who lost her life and for everyone connected to the situation.

DDD often states "make sure of your target and what's beyond". That is such good advice.

The human eye takes in far too much info for our brains to process. So the brain takes shortcuts to build an image. The image could be real or imagined.

Not saying this happened in the incident above. Not condoning anything.

Many years ago I was hunting and had just dusted snow off a fallen tree and took a seat. Within a few minutes an image was walking towards me. I clearly saw an elderly person wearing a brown cloak. It didn't matter that I was at least 2 km from any woods road.

My first instinct was to speak to the person so that they wouldn't be frightened by my close presence. Just a second before I spoke, the real image appeared. It was a 10 pt buck.

Our brains are easily fooled. That is why it is so vital to identify the target and what's beyond. Take a moment to be absolutely certain of what you're looking at. You have time - the rest of your life - to be sure.
 

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Yikes. It is chilling to hear the details. Really sad for the woman who lost her life and for everyone connected to the situation.

DDD often states "make sure of your target and what's beyond". That is such good advice.

The human eye takes in far too much info for our brains to process. So the brain takes shortcuts to build an image. The image could be real or imagined.

Not saying this happened in the incident above. Not condoning anything.

Many years ago I was hunting and had just dusted snow off a fallen tree and took a seat. Within a few minutes an image was walking towards me. I clearly saw an elderly person wearing a brown cloak. It didn't matter that I was at least 2 km from any woods road.

My first instinct was to speak to the person so that they wouldn't be frightened by my close presence. Just a second before I spoke, the real image appeared. It was a 10 pt buck.

Our brains are easily fooled. That is why it is so vital to identify the target and what's beyond. Take a moment to be absolutely certain of what you're looking at. You have time - the rest of your life - to be sure.
This is so true. Especially early or later in the day when the light is low. I have seen a lot of Spruce Moose. In Ont. binoculars are an essential piece of equipment because we had to be able to tell the difference between a calf, a yearling cow or bull. At one time, a hunter could shoot a calf, but needed to win an adult tag to harvest a bull or cow. You needed to make sure that the calf you thought you were shooting did not have four ears. Also yearling triplets could be difficult to distinguish from this May's single calf as it was the only animal nursing and could grow rapidly compared to triplets. Lots of hunters have tagged small yearlings thinking they had a nice calf, only to fine that it was a small cow and it became the property of the crown. :huh:
 

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Your eyes can fool you,that's for sure.Once saw what looked like a deer bounding away on an old woods road.But something didn't seem right and as I looked closer it appeared to be a deer walking slow with its tail up.Under further scrutiny I realized it was a Woman,wearing a dark jacket,blond hair in a pony tail,walking along the woods road! Her pony tail bouncing as she walked.
When I caught up to her and explained to her it was hunting season and she should dress appropriately,she asked me if she looked like a deer,I tried to explain to her that at a glance she had and someone less responsible may have shot her.She pretty much told me I needed to see an eye doctor and proceeded to give me sheet,so I just walked away.
My point is I wanted to see a deer so my first thought was " it's a deer ".When we pick up any weapon we also " pick up" a HUGE responsibility to go with it.BE 100% SURE BEFORE YOU EVEN RAISE THAT FIREARM !!! It's too late after your pull the trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
January 5, 2018 - Deer hunter Robert Trundy of Hebron pleaded not guilty Friday in the Oct. 28 shooting death of Karen Wrentzel on her property in Hebron. Appearing in Oxford County Superior Court, Trundy, 38, denied charges of manslaughter, failure to provide aid to a person and to report a hunting accident. He is scheduled to return to the court March 9. Trundy was indicted by an Oxford County grand jury Dec. 15. Wrentzel, 34, died on her property along Greenwood Mountain Road at about 10:30 a.m. when she was shot by Trundy on opening day of deer hunting season for Maine residents, Maine Game Warden Anthony Gray said in an affidavit. Trundy said he could see "what he thought was the 'ass of a deer' with a tail, skinny legs and a possible glimpse of what he thought could have been part of a head or antler of a deer," Gray wrote. Under Maine law, a person is guilty of manslaughter when they act recklessly or with criminal negligence and cause the death of another person. A conviction is punishable by up to 30 years in prison and a fine of up to $50,000. Maine law requires a hunter who knows or "has reason to know" that he has caused injury to another person by a firearm, a bow and arrow or a crossbow while hunting to make himself known to the victim, render first aid and notify a game warden or other law enforcement officer as quickly as possible. Failure to do so is a Class C felony, punishable by up to five years in jail and a fine of up to $5,000.

http://www.sunjournal.com/hunter-pleads-not-guilty-in-death-of-hebron-woman/
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
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